Activities

LUNCH.COM
Lunch.Com meets every Friday at 12:30 p.m. for lunch. Contact Lorraine Mullin for a lunch reservation.

GREAT DECISIONS
Great Decisions meets the second Tuesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. Contact Mary Witherspoon for more information.

MORNING BRIDGE
Morning Bridge meets the third Tuesday of the month at 9:30 a.m. Contact Mary Johnson for more information.

BOOK CLUB
¡Adelante! Book of the Month Club usually meets on the fourth Monday of each month at 5:30 p.m. For more information, contact: Karen Rudiger, Patricia Smith, or June Wilson. For Zoom meetings, please register with Cate Hewitt a few days before the meeting.

October Book

The Undocumented Americans by Karla Cornejo Vallavicencio

Writer Karla Cornejo Villavicencio was on DACA when she decided to write about being undocumented for the first time using her own name. It was right after the election of 2016, the day she realized the story she’d tried to steer clear of was the only one she wanted to tell.  So she wrote her immigration lawyer’s phone number on her hand in Sharpie and embarked on a trip across the country to tell the stories of her fellow undocumented immigrants—and to find the hidden key to her own.

 

November Book

Crooked Hallelujah by Kelli Jo Ford

Kelli Jo Ford’s debut novel Crooked Hallelujah follows three generations of Cherokee women trying to forge a future in very harsh environments. Lula, her daughter Justine and Justine’s daughter Reney make lives for themselves, mostly in Oklahoma and Texas, amid the 1980s oil boom. But these Cherokee women find out how difficult it really is.

 

December Book

Nobody Will Tell You This But Me by Bess Kalb

“Reliably funny…poignant on the aftermath of loss. Written from the sometimes acerbic, sometimes sweet and always laser-sharp perspective of [Kalb’s grandmother,] Bobby Bell … in between are loving recollections of their relationship, including snippets of conversations and voicemails and a steady supply of life advice.”—Chris Barton, Los Angeles Times

 

January Book

Lige of the Black Walnut Tree: Growing Up Black in Southern Appalachia by Mary Othella Burnette

Mary Othella Burnette, an 89 year old African American woman, was born and reared in Black Mountain, North Carolina. While much has been documented about White communities in Southern Appalachia, little has been written by a native mountaineer about African Americans living in that area. All of Ms. Burnette’s stories are rare, and most of them contain vibrant and emotional depictions of characters she grew up with and around from early childhood through the mid-1940’s, a time when the sun was setting on the lives of the few surviving family members of freed slaves and their community-minded heirs who settled in the Swannanoa Valley after 1865.

February Book

The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race by Walter Isaacson

The bestselling author of Leonardo da Vinci and Steve Jobs returns with a gripping account of how Nobel Prize winner Jennifer Doudna and her colleagues launched a revolution that will allow us to cure diseases, fend off viruses, and have healthier babies.

 

 

March Book

The Three Mothers: How the Mothers of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X and James Baldwin Shaped a Nation by Anna Malaika Tubbs

In her groundbreaking and essential debut The Three Mothers, scholar Anna Malaika Tubbs celebrates Black motherhood by telling the story of the women who raised and shaped three of America’s most pivotal heroes.

 

April Book

Waste: One Woman’s Fight Against America’s Dirty Secret by Catherine Coleman Flowers

MacArthur “genius” Catherine Coleman Flowers grew up in Lowndes County, Alabama, a place that’s been called “Bloody Lowndes” because of its violent, racist history. Once the epicenter of the voting rights struggle, today it’s Ground Zero for a new movement that is Flowers’s life’s work. It’s a fight to ensure human dignity through a right most Americans take for granted: basic sanitation. Too many people, especially the rural poor, lack an affordable means of disposing cleanly of the waste from their toilets, and, as a consequence, live amid filth.

May Book

The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row by Anthony Ray Hinton

An urgent, emotional memoir from one of the longest-serving condemned death row inmates to be found innocent in America. … A heart-wrenching yet ultimately hopeful story about truth, justice, and the need for criminal justice reform.” – Kirkus, Starred Review

 

June Book

White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk about Racism by Robin DiAngelo

Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue.

 

July Book

The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together by Heather McGhee

A powerful exploration of inequality and the lesson that generations of Americans have failed to learn: Racism has a cost for everyone—not just for people of color.

 

 

August Book

Go Tell It On the Mountain by James Baldwin

In one of the greatest American classics, Baldwin chronicles a fourteen-year-old boy’s discovery of the terms of his identity. Baldwin’s rendering of his protagonist’s spiritual, sexual, and moral struggle of self-invention opened new possibilities in the American language and in the way Americans understand themselves.

 

 


2021-2022 Adelante Book Selection

September: Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning by Cathy Park Hong

October: The Undocumented Americans by Karla Cornejo Vallavicencio

November: Crooked Hallelujah by Kelli Jo Ford

December: Nobody Will Tell You This But Me by Bess Kalb

January: Lige of the Black Walnut Tree: Growing Up Black in Southern Appalachia by Mary Othella Burnette

February: The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race by Walter Isaacson

March: The Three Mothers: How the Mothers of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X and James Baldwin Shaped a Nation by Anna Malaika Tubbs

April: Waste: One Woman’s Fight Against America’s Dirty Secret by Catherine Coleman Flowers

May: The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row by Anthony Ray Hinton

June: White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk about Racism by Robin DiAngelo

July: The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together by Heather McGhee

August: Go Tell It On the Mountain by James Baldwin